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Pictured here a few gold coins from the Ancient World  

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Gold Stater of Philip II minted in Macedonia circa 340 BC

This stater was minted at the Pella Macedonian mint during the reign of Philip II, father of Alexander the Great. The obverse depicts the short haired head of the god Apollo. The reverse pictures a galloping biga driven by a charioteer and the legend FILOPPOU in Greek with the mintmark of a thunderbolt under the forelegs of the horses. This coin weighs 8,58 grams and is similar to SG-6663 (Seaby Greek Catalog).


Gold Stater of Alexander III ("the Great") minted in Macedonia circa 325 BC

This stater was minted at a Macedonian mint (Probably at the Amphipolis mint) during the reign of Alexander. The obverse depicts the head of the goddess Athena in a Corinthian helmet. There is a symbolic snake on the helmet. The reverse pictures a standing goddess Nike holding a victory wreath and a ship's mast and the legend ALEXANDROU in Greek with the mintmark of a shield to the left of Nike. This coin weighs 8,58 grams and is cataloged as Price 176 and is similar to Muller751 and SG-6705.


 

Gold Stater of Koson,. circa 50 BC

This stater was minted in the Koson area of Thrace by an unknown group believed to be of Scythian origin.  Many people attribute the coin to Brutus because the obverse features a scene found on denarii issued under him in Rome, three figures in togas, one being Brutus with two other ligates. Below the figures is the believed city's name KOSON in Greek. The reverse has a depiction of an eagle standing on a sceptre holding a victory wreath in its claw. 

This series of gold staters was assigned to Brutus who according to Appian struck coins from the treasures consigned to him by Polemocratia, the widow of the Thracian dynast Sadalas. The obverse is certainly copied from the denarii of Brutus struck 54 BC (Cr 443/1) but the coins were issued by a "Koson", possibly a Scythian king who died 29 BC. The monogram could either stand for BR (Brutus) or OLB (Olbia, possible place of mintage) - the eagle holding a wreath is an Olbian type (thanks to Andrew McCabe for this).

The coin is cataloged as SG-1733.


Gold Aureus of Julius Caesar minted by A. Hirtius - 46 BC

This aureus was minted in Rome by the moneyer A. Hirtius to pay troops that fought under Caesar defeating the forces of Pompey at Thapsus in North Africa during the civil war. The obverse is believed to feature a veiled head of the goddess Pietas with the legend C CAESAR COS TER (Caius Caesar Third Consulship) to the left. The reverse shows pontifical and augurship emblems, the lituus and the axe with the legend A HIRTIUS PR (Aulus Hirtius Praetor). Gaius Julius Caesar was born in 100 BC. He set himself up as Dictator in 49 BC which was resented by leading Romans and which led to his assassination in 44 BC. At one point he even issued coins inscribed as CAESAR DICT PERPETVO (Caesar Perpetual Dictator). This coin weighs 8,22 grams and is SrM-1395.


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Gold Stater of Ambiani Tribe

This uniface coin was minted by the Celtic Ambiani tribe during the Gallic War. This tribe made its home near present day Amiens, France. Many of these coins are found in Britain left there during the Gallic War against Caesar. The coin features a large disjointed prancing horse with a crescent above and a pellet below.  The coin was issued between 58 to 55 BC and it weighs 6,25 grams.

 


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Gold Quarter Stater of Tasciovanos

This quarter stater was minted in Britain by the Celtic Catuvellauni tribe sometime between 20 and 5 BC. The coin was apparently minted in Verlamion (present day St. Albans) as the letters VERO are on the obverse in the quarters of the wreath. The reverse has a prancing horse with the letters TAS below which is for the King Tasciovanus who reuled the tribe from around 20BC until his death in 9 AD. This is a small coin, on;y 12,79mm weighing 1,37 grams. The coin is lisated as BMC 1646.


Gold Aureus of Tiberius circa 21-25 AD

This aureus was minted in Lugdunum (present day Lyon, France) . It features the same images that are on the famous Tribute Penny mentioned in the Bible when the Jewish priests tried to entrap Jesus into making an anti-Roman statement and He tactfully replied: "Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and render unto God the things that are God's." The obverse has a laureate head of Tiberius facing right surrounded by the legend TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS. The reverse includes a seated female figure holding a spear and a branch believed to be the emperor's mother, Livia, and the legend PONTIF MAX. Tiberius was born in 42 BC and ruled from 14 to 37 BC. This coin weighs 6,22 grams and is SrM-1760.


Gold Aureus of Nero circa 65-66 AD

This aureus was minted in Rome. The obverse has a laureated bust of Nero facing right with the legend NERO CAESAR AVGVSTVS. The reverse has a seated figure of Salus, goddess of health and safety, holding a patera with the legend SALVS. Nero was the emperor who, legend says, fiddled while Rome burned. This great fire occurred in 64 AD. This coin was issued to commemorate Nero's escape from the conspiracy of C. Calpurnius Piso. Nero committed suicide in 68 AD. This coin weighs 7,16 grams and is listed as SrM-1932. 


Gold Solidus of Constantius II circa 351-355 AD

This solidus was minted in Constantinople. The obverse has a helmeted bust of Constantius facing forward with the legend FL IVL CONSTANTIVS PERP AVGV . The reverse has a seated figures of Roma and Constantinopolis holding a shield enscribed VOT XXX MVLT XXXX with the legend GLORIA REI PVBLICAE.  In the exergue is the mintmark CONS. This coin weighs 4,40 grams and is similar to SR-3988 but it has the AVGV legend (i.l.o. AVG) and the CONS mintmark. It is number 96 in RIC Vol. VIII, page 455.


Gold Solidus of Honorius circa 397-402 AD

This solidus was minted in Constantinople, the capitol of the Eastern Empire. The obverse features a bust of Honorius facing right with the legend D N HONORIVS PF AVG. On the reverse we find a figure representing Constantinopolis enthroned holding a sceptre and Victory standing on a globe with the legend CONCORDIA AVGGG. Honorius was born in 384 AD. He attained the rank of Augustus in 393 AD and acceded to the throne in 395 AD. He had a tumultuous reign and died in 432 AD. During his rule, Alaric and the Visigoths besieged Rome and finally sacked it in 410 AD. This coin weighs 4,40 grams and is listed as RIC-8.


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Gold Solidus of Justin I circa 518-527 AD

This solidus was minted in Constantinople, the capitol of the Eastern Empire. The obverse features a bust of Justin facing right with the legend D N IVSTINVS PF AVG. On the reverse we find a figure of the standing emperor hold a long sceptre and a cross.  The officina is  Theta. This coin weighs 4,16 grams, has a diametre of 19,6 mm and is listed as Sear-345.  


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Gold Solidus of Justinian I circa 527-565 AD

This solidus was minted in Constantinople, the capitol of the Eastern Empire. The obverse features a bust of Justinian facing forward with the legend D N IVSTINIANVS PF AVG. On the reverse we find a figure of a standing angel hold a long sceptre and a cross.  The officina is  Theta. This coin weighs 4,21 grams, has a diametre of 19,6 mm and is listed as Sear-140.  


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